Author Archives: Lezlie Laws

A Fall Invitation to Read and Discuss “Becoming Wise”

Krista Tippett - Becoming Wise Book DiscussionI invite you to join GladdeningLight and LifeArt Studio for an exploration of words, flesh, love, faith, and hope from the Peabody Award-winning author Krista Tippett, host of next January’s GladdeningLight Symposium in Winter Park.  In anticipation of this event, LifeArt Studio and GladdeningLight will partner for a three-part book discussion series focused on Tippett’s latest book, Becoming Wise: An Inquiry into the Mystery and Art of Living.

Book Discussion Dates, Times, and Locales (all in Winter Park):

• Thursday, October 26:  7-9 pm, Winter Park Racquet Club, 2111 Via Tuscany
• Thursday, November 9:  7-9 pm, All Saints Episcopal Church, 338 E Lyman Ave.
• Thursday, November 30:  7-9 pm, All Saints Episcopal Church, 338 E Lyman Ave.

Visit Eventbrite for information and registration.  Don’t delay.  Seating is limited, and advance registration is required.*

Want to join for free?  You can!  If you are registered for the GladdeningLight Symposium on January 25-28, 2018, your registration fee for this book discussion series is waived, AND GladdeningLight will provide you with a free copy of Becoming Wise!  To participate, email info@lezlielaws.com directly with proof of your Symposium registration, and I will make sure you are on the reserved list for these conversations.

If you love art, deep thought, and great conversation, join me and the LifeAt Studio community for this event.  Deepen your knowledge of Krista Tippett—an important thinker, writer, and gifted interviewer.

I look forward to having you join us!

Mystic

imagesThey call her a mystic,
but she looks like an angel to me.
Lots of hair.
It grows.
It waves.
It covers her shoulders. It blows in the wind.
Arms stretch east and west; she flies. Fingers splay, reach, point.
Charms dangle from her arms—a moon, a sun, a thunder bolt, a globe of glass, and, too, the stars.

These are instruments of prophecy.
Her skirt, a hoop of blues—aqua, navy, sky. A skirt for hiding.
And those eyes, oh those eyes. They slay me, ogle me, taunt me to pay attention.

“Who are you?” she whispers to the clouds.
(“Look under my skirt and you’ll find out. I am not a mystery.”)

Eyes pierce; eyes know what can be seen.
Around her neck, pearls. Is she a lady too?
On her lips, color.
The red of passion,
the blood of demons,
the blush of maidens,
the stain of lovers,
the last of sunset,
the warning for sailors.
No, a lady she is not.

30 Hydrogen Bombs

CloudCult-44There is good news all around us. Let’s focus on some of it.

Craig Minowa is a singer/songwriter whose poetic lyrics, heartbreaking melodies, and raspy voice combine to deliver good news of the human heart. In an interview with On Being’s Krista Tippett, Minowa says his latest album is called The Seeker because “that’s what we’re here to do. I don’t know what we’ll find, but it’s really not about an individual. It’s sort of a story for humanity as a whole. And I feel like that we’re on that crust, that era, as a people, that we have the potential to wake up to a new age. We have the responsibility to wake up to a new age. There isn’t any room for pessimism anymore. Time is limited. And so yeah, it’s all on the table with this one, as far as lyrics go, of trying to wake myself and anybody around me up to the fact of ‘Hey, let’s go be good people and do a good job.’”

I have been listening to his music all weekend. Blending personal pain, theology, biology, and evolution of the earth, Minowa’s songs are so “good,” so sincere, so filled with hope and commitment to being fully human. I urge you to listen to this interview and the beautiful segments of his music it contains. You may not like his style, but surely you will be moved by his beautiful seeking for truth.

And finally, there is just so much raw hope in his music and in what he says in this interview. I am using the Greek word eudaimonia a lot these days in my workshops. It means living in a state in which you are fulfilling your highest potential. And so much of my teaching is about just that—finding strategies, pathways, and habits of mind that will lead to eudaimonia.

And while Minowa doesn’t use the word eudaimonia, that’s exactly what he’s talking about at the end of the interview when he says,

“But now we’re here, and we are incredibly advanced organisms who are not grasping our potential. And we have to be courageous about laying down our insecurities and our fears, in order to get to the point that we can really embrace that energy in us.

There was a fact that I read — all of physical matter, as we know, is made of energy, and all physical matter can be converted back into energy, and it takes a tremendous amount of energy to make the smallest particle of matter. And so in the average human body, there’s 7×10 to the 18th power joules of energy, and that translates into 30 hydrogen bombs. Just this physical body right here, the energy in it, is equivalent to 30 hydrogen bombs. And that’s my only guarantee. I don’t know about tomorrow, but I have right now, and I’ve got this power. What am I going to do with it?”

Good question for all of us, right?

What are you going to do with all that energy you have pent up inside you? What will you create? Who will you touch? What can you offer? Don’t say you don’t know how. You’ve got 30 hydrogen bombs worth of energy to help you do what only you can do.

Step into your eudaimonia.